Houses of Decay

The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age.  – H.P. Lovecraft

James Joyce had a penchant for nesting obscure references in his writing that are indecipherable to nearly anyone who isn’t James Joyce (have you noticed?). There’s something appealingly stubborn about this style of writing – the writer communicating to their reader, “Look, I’m not going to throw you a branch. Either learn how to swim or enjoy drowning.” If you do learn to swim, though, there are rewards. Tucked into Stephen’s inner monologue in “Proteus” is a passage, obscure at first (naturally), that reveals the story of a Christian mystic, a W. B. Yeats short story and an obstinate young Artist:

Continue reading “Houses of Decay”

Ep. 13 – The Nostalgia Trap (w/ Tom O’Leary)

Kelly and Dermot welcome Tom O’Leary back to the podcast to talk about the allure of nostalgia. Tom and Dermot talk about what it’s actually like to be an Irish person who left their home country to seek their fortune abroad, nostalgia for their past, Americans’ nostalgia for an Ireland that never was, and how Joyce’s nostalgia for Ireland shaped his work.

Continue reading “Ep. 13 – The Nostalgia Trap (w/ Tom O’Leary)”

A Break for Tea and Biscuits

If you’re a regular reader of the blog form of Blooms and Barnacles, you’ve likely noticed the blog has been pretty quiet the last month or so. We have both hit extraordinarily busy patches in our work outside the blog, and it’s been hard to find the time research, write and produce art for the site. We aren’t going away permanently, but our brief hiatus has gone on longer than expected, so it seemed like a good time to explain why. We’ll be back soon enough, but in the mean time, we need to take a little break. We plan to keep producing episodes of the podcast, so you can catch us there for now. See you soon, Joyceans!

Pyrrhus, Pyrrhic victory, James Joyce, Ulysses

Ep. 12 – Wings of Excess

Pyrrhus_and_his_Elephants
Pyrrhus and his Elephants

“One more victory like that and we’re done for.” Kelly and Dermot discuss the ancient Greek warrior king Pyrrhus and his relation to the excesses of the 20th century. In addition to ancient Greeks, Vico and figroll-munching children, the impact of the Easter Rising of 1916 and World War I on James Joyce and Ulysses are also discussed.

Continue reading “Ep. 12 – Wings of Excess”

Ep. 11 – Kelly Bryan

39748441_10102648692960357_5371947615535497216_oOn a Very Special Episode of the Blooms & Barnacles podcast – it’s Dermot’s first time leading an episode. He chose to interview his co-host and founder of the podcast, Kelly. He talks to her about why she’s the one to teach the world about Ulysses, her insane dream to stage “Circe,” how to make a soffee, and how she got invited to a party by the Lord Mayor of Dublin. A different vibe than our normal show, but don’t worry, it’s the good kind of weird. Continue reading “Ep. 11 – Kelly Bryan”

Decoding Dedalus: Omphalos

Daedalus in Ulysses was Joyce himself, so he was terrible. Joyce was so damn romantic and intellectual about him. He’d made Bloom up. Bloom was wonderful. – Ernest Hemingway, “On Writing”

This is a post in a series called Decoding Dedalus where I take a paragraph of Ulysses and  break it down line by line.

The passage below comes from “Proteus,” the second episode of Ulysses. It appears on pages 37 -38 in my copy (1990 Vintage International). We’ll be looking at the passage that begins “They came down the steps…” and ends “…clotted hinderparts.” 

They came down the steps from Leahy’s terrace prudently, Frauenzimmer: and down the shelving shore flabbily, their splayed feet sinking in the silted sand.

Who are they?

One “unhelpful” thing that pops up regularly in Stephen’s stream of conscious is unattributed pronouns. Joyce has enough faith in us, the readers, to figure out who “they” might be. I suppose we should be flattered. In this case, the “they” are “frauenzimmer” descending to Sandymount Strand. Here’s another thing Stephen likes to do – answer a question he posed himself in a foreign language. In German, “frauenzimmer” means either “lady of fashion” or a “nitwit, drab, sloven or wench.” I’m guessing, based on the description that  follows, Joyce intended to conjure the latter image in your mind. Leahy’s Terrace is a street in Sandymount that is no longer near the sea due to development in the area that included extending the shoreline.

Continue reading “Decoding Dedalus: Omphalos”